Don’t Buy New Jeans! Repair Them in 4 Easy Steps

Did you know that jeans and denim are just about the most polluting and water consuming piece of clothing that you own? Indeed, it takes approximately 2,000 gallons of water to even grow the amount of cotton required for the raw material in a single pair of jeans.  Little known by the public, a majority of the cotton used to manufacture jeans sold in the U.S. is grown in China and India and consists of genetically modified hybrids that require high amounts of pesticides that are very damaging to the environment.

Many more hundreds of gallons of water are then used to dye the cotton that beautiful indigo color that we’re so addicted to. This is also a highly toxic process, affecting the health of the workers involved in the dying and design process, and causing monumental damage from the run-off and fumes from the dye.

When you purchase the jeans, the water consumption doesn’t stop there. Over the lifetime of your favorite pair, 1,000+ gallons of water will be used in consumer care (washing) and in their final disposal.

Have I convinced you yet not to buy new jeans? If not, I’d encourage you to look in your closet first and check the tally on your total number of pairs. Chances are you own about seven. I myself own six, but I really only wear about two consistently. I’m proud to say though, that three out of the six I got as a hand-me-down, picked up at a clothing swap, or bought used. Anyways….the point is that we own double the amount of jeans that we really need and that waste has a negative effect on the environment (and our bank accounts). Here’s an idea: let’s take care of our beloved jeans, and repair them when necessary, instead of tossing them in the trash.

So, here’s how to repair holes in your jeans very easily and cheaply (for the price of a cup of coffee- definitely less than the price of a new pair)!

  1. Buy a repair kit, or better yet, cut a patch out of an old pair of jeans.
  2. If you do the latter, skip step 3.IMG-2215
  3. Flip your jeans inside out and cut away any loose strings from the hole. Lay them flat and cut the patch to the size of the hole. Make sure that there is about .5 – 1 inch extra patch around the perimeter of the hole to give yourself space for sewing.IMG-22203. Pre-heat your iron for three to five minutes on the “cotton” setting,  and place a towel or piece of brown paper bag between the jeans and your work surface. Next, heat up the fabric around the hole before placing the patch over the area to be repaired. Press down firmly with the iron until the patch is securely adhered to the jeans.IMG-22184. If you don’t have a sewing machine, then you can skip this step, and you’re done! However, I always reinforce the iron-on patch by sewing it with my machine to ensure that it will not come off and the hole will not rip any further. Try to buy a spool of thread as close to the jean color as possible, and then start sewing! IMG-2221Tip: I’ve found that a spiral pattern looks nice, secures the patch, and blends in well with the fabric. But, really, you can sew in whichever direction you prefer. Ta-da!

Do you have any tips for jeans repair? I’d love to hear about them!

Find more fashion-related water facts here.

Valentine’s Day, the Non-Corporate Way

This year — skip the expensive dinner, and store bought cards, candy, giant stuffed teddy bear, and standard flower arrangements, for something much more special, unique, and good for your wallet and the environment.

This February 14, my plan is to buy some ingredients from the local market and cook a nice dinner at home with my boyfriend. For his presents, I purchased a shea butter bar from Lush and a book from Powell’s. We’re keeping it cozy and will be doing our good deed for the day by babysitting his brother’s adorable one year old daughter while her parents go out for a much-needed date night.

For you though, the possibilities are endless!

Instead of buying a cliche, mass-produced Hallmark card, you could: 

Make one yourself! Not only is it more eco-friendly, cheaper, and more fun than buying a $5 card, but there’s no better way to communicate exactly how you feel or what you want to say, than by making a card to your personal requirements and specifications. Don’t know where to start?

  1. Grab a few magazines (and/or old cards, newspaper, photos, stickers, etc.), a pair of scissors, tape and/or glue, and some paper or cardboard from the recycling bin, and get to work!
  2. I generally begin without a set idea or direction in mind, and then cut out anything that feels “right” or makes me think of the person (or an inside joke, shared memory) for whom I’m making the card.
  3. After I’ve compiled a decent set of pictures, photos, words, and/or stickers, I start playing around with them on the paper. Keep an open mind, and you’ll see that a theme starts to emerge, and at this point you should start to get pretty excited thinking about the person’s reaction when they read it.
  4. From there, finish it up by using a pen/glitter pen/paint/marker/crayon to complete the sentiment, and put it away somewhere safe to dry.

I can almost guarantee-or-your-money-back, that the individual receiving your homemade art, will treasure and remember it for years to come.

Instead of ordering a dozen roses or expensive bouquet of flowers, you could:

Put together your own succulent or potted plant arrangement. I personally love succulents because they’re incredibly easy to keep alive — infrequently (minimum every two weeks) pour a tiny bit of water into the soil and keep it near a light source — but they’re also more eco-friendly than buying flowers that are going to shrivel and die within a few days. Unlike stemmed roses, a cactus lasts, my friends.  As an added bonus, cacti are, for some unknown reason (maybe because they’re Millennial-friendly and low maintenance) very trendy at the moment, and oh-so-Instagram-worthy.

  1. Start by first looking around your house for a container. Mason jars are super cute, but even other old jars or containers can be used as-is or, if you’re feeling extra-crafty, you can paint or decoupage the outside for some added oomph and personalization. I’ve even seen plants potted in old shoes, so, really, the sky is the limit with the container you could use. Let your imagination run wild, and make it special for the recipient.
  2. Next, head to a plant nursery to pick up your new green friend. Avoid the plant departments of Wal-Mart, Lowe’s, and Home Depot, and instead opt for a locally owned store. A quick duckduckgo.com search should turn up some viable options.
  3. Before you leave for the store, make sure you have your container AKA the plant baby’s new home, with you. This really helps with picking out the right size plant since you need to ensure there’s sufficient room for the plant’s roots to grow and expand. If you need help, the folks at the nursery will be more than eager to assist you in selecting the best plant for your container and the recipient’s lifestyle.
  4. At this point, all that’s left is to remove your plant from the plastic container it arrived in and repot it in the container you prepared.
  5. As a finishing touch, you could create your own instruction care card and tie it around the container with a ribbon, piece of twine, string, etc. that you have lying around the house.
  6. Then, just be sure to keep it alive until you give it away to its new owner!

 

Instead of buying a box of Dove/Lindt/Godiva chocolates, you could:

Make your own chocolate-dipped strawberries or truffles! There are a million and two recipes out there for both, and trust me, they’re much easier to make than we’re lead to believe. You can also customize them based on the recipient’s taste preferences, and get really creative with the box in which you give them.

  1. Find a recipe. A quick duckduckgo.com search will yield myriad results.
  2. Head to your local shop to pick up the ingredients. The standard required items will most likely be baking chocolate, flavoring (e.g., vanilla extract), and, if you’re planning on making dipped items, the fruit, pretzel, bacon, etc.
  3. For those who have yet to venture into the kitchen, rest assured that there are plenty of cooking shows out there that will guide you every step of the way.
  4. Make your items.
  5. Let them cool for a sufficient time as directed in the recipe. I would even recommend letting them sit overnight to ensure completeness.
  6. Find your box. It could be an old jewelry box, cardboard box that you decorate, vintage container/cigarette box, etc. Again, let your imagination run wild.

 

What are your plans for Valentine’s Day? I would love to hear about what you did to celebrate the non-corporate way!

A Counter-Corporate Christmas

If you’re like me, you haven’t quite finished your Christmas shopping yet, even though it’s only ten days away! As I’ve started to put more mental energy towards this initiative, I speculated that others might just be in the same predicament, and could use a cheat sheet, so here it is! And what could be a better opportunity to challenge yourself to buy (or make) everything from a counter-culture establishment. As an added bonus, your gifts will surely be more creative, thoughtful, and rewarding.

As you’ll notice in the list below, the gift ideas that I’ve generated will tend to be more special, and budget and eco-friendly than the normal gift-cards and standard, mass-produced items, and I guarantee you will have a more fun gift-buying experience as a result. Instead of seeing shopping as a chore, take some time to reflect on what you value, as well as what the recipient values, and start from there. Open up your mind and start brainstorming, and I know you’ll think of the perfect thing! Furthermore, shift your perspective on this time of the year from annoyance and stress to one of  mindful treasure-hunting! You’ll not only save time by avoiding big-box stores with long lines, but you’ll be able to save money, contribute to local, small businesses, and strengthen your community all at once. Convinced yet?

Let me know how it goes and if you have any other counter-corporate gift ideas to add!

  1. Adopt a baby elephant in the recipient’s name for only $50/year. They’ll receive monthly updates and photos of their orphan straight to their e-mail, and will feel good knowing that they’re helping elephants in Kenya survive without their mothers (most of whom have been killed by poachers)! Link here.
  2. Visit a locally owned coffee roaster, tea house, micro-brew or winery and pick out some small-batch items for the coffee/tea/beer/wine lover on your list. A quick duckduckgo search (an alternative to Google) will yield plenty of results.
  3. Whatever you can think of, there’s someone on Etsy who can make it! From custom-made everything to vintage items, handmade jewelry, clothes, home decor; the possibilities are truly endless. (For example, my friend loves sloths, and I was able to purchase some of the cutest sloth earrings and bookmark at an affordable price).
  4. Get creative and make your own:
    1. Jewelry– go to your local bead store to pick up some supplies, or do what I love to do and take apart broken or mismatched pieces that I already own and then put them back together in interesting ways, to create a brand new piece.
    2. Candles– buy wax, coloring, and flavored scents, then look up directions online and fill your house with delicious odors.
    3. Lotion –I use a base of shea butter and add either marula or vitamin e oil, as well as essential oils like Tea Tree or Lavendar for scent. Again, the possibilities are endless and you can customize it based on the recipient’s preferences. (There are lots of recipes online that can be found by searching DIY lotion).
  5. Potted plants are always a hit! I recommend the eco-friendly option of decorating empty jars or containers you have lying around the house, or stop buy your local thrift store (avoid Goodwill), and pick up some cool pots. Then, fill with potting soil and an easy-to-care-for plant like succulents or Aloe Vera.
  6. If you want to buy clothes or cosmetics, check out Poshmark  and buy from an individual rather than a corporation. (I recently purchased a brand new pair of Toms from Poshmark for my boyfriend for Christmas).
  7. Visit a local Christmas/community/holiday/church fair to purchase a locally-made items.
  8. Bake! Everyone loves homemade fudge, cookies, candy, etc. If you don’t own a cookbook, the internet has myriad recipes available, most of them being quite easy to follow.
  9. Get artsy! I personally love making collages using old magazines. I find that you can make a really unique piece of art for someone using something as simple as scissors, glue, magazines and/or photos, and a canvas or piece of cardboard. I’ll be making one for my Mom this year using a line from her favorite poet as inspiration.

Last, but not least, wrap those presents in newspapers or other paper or cloth you might have lying around! (I also compulsively save old ribbons for this very purpose).

Good luck and happy gifting!

**The image is a photo of the Swedish Tomte Christmas gnomes that my cousin and I made last week! Here’s the link if you’d like to give it a shot 🙂

Super Oils & Honey

Over the past few months I’ve slowly transitioned to using more pure and natural beauty cosmetic as alternatives to mass-produced creams filled with chemicals and preservatives, and my body couldn’t be happier! Below, I’ll share some of my favorite DIY beauty tricks that are both good for your skin and good for your wallet.

For the below anti-corporate products, make sure you buy products that do not have any additives or additional chemicals, and buy from local and small producers! Your community health food store or direct from a producer online (as opposed to Amazon) is a good place to start.

  1. Vitamin E Oil: this amazing multi-purpose oil can be used:
    • To heal scars anywhere on your body
    • As a moisturizer on your face (it absorbs remarkably fast and is incredibly nourishing; I use it just about every day)
    • As body lotion
    • As a personal lubricant
  2. Marula Oil: this oil can be used:
    • In your hair to make it stronger and shiny (similar to Argan oil)
    • On your face as a moisturizer and body
    • To clear up psoriasis (my sister swears by it
  3. Honey (buy raw and local): can be used:
    • As a face mask– cover face in a layer and leave on for 15-20 minutes before rinsing. Will leave face feeling luxurious and glowing. Can be repeated daily or minimum once a week.
    • As a face wash: mix equal parts honey, Bragg’s apple cider vinegar and olive oil in a bottle (I re-used the one from my old face wash); shake before use, and apply to damp/wet face. Close those eyes, as the vinegar can sting.
    • As an antiseptic on cuts and burns
    • As a sleep-aid
    • For weight management
    • For sore throats and coughs

Have you used any of these products? What are your favorite brands?