Day 9

If I’m being honest, I’ve been actively avoiding taking a trip to the grocery store since starting my anti-corporate challenge. However, I was forced into it today due to the fact that I volunteered to bring a quiche to my office holiday party this week.

While I have a theory that I will end up with overall savings by buying less items, in general, I have still been scared of the costs involved with only buying from small, local businesses and ethical companies. At some point I’d like do a one-for-one cost comparison between a corporate”basket” of goods and against similar anti-corporate goods, but for now, I’ll just have to go with my gut telling me that I definitely spent more money than normal. Granted, I’m also gluten-free, so those items are always more expensive (for no good reason, in my opinion. Since when does rice cost more than wheat? But that’s another story) no matter where one shops.

With that being said, my total bill from Yes! Organic Market (locally owned and operated) for the items listed above (+ a Medicinals peppermint tea and second chocolate bar, that I had already put away, and started eating, respectively) came to $71.32 for 14 items. The most expensive things being the honey ($8.99) and baguettes ($7.29). I felt the honey was worth the price considering it is 100% local, raw, unprocessed honey; and I tend to use honey a lot on my face as a healing mask, so I was comfortable with paying that price. As far as the baguettes go, for anyone living that gluten-free lifestyle, these babies are to die for! I make a mouth-watering avocado toast using the baguettes and it is worth every penny.

 

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Another point to note from my trip was that it took me a lot longer to shop even though I bought a reduced number of items. However, I don’t expect it to take as long in the future as I become more familiar with companies and products that meet my conditions. This time around many minutes were spent grabbing items off a shelf, to only put them back from whence they came. I relied heavily on Buycott to provide me with information about the products’ parent companies corporate structure, all of which could be found by scanning the barcode with my phone’s camera in the app. I will say that the business nerd in me was intrigued by various company “family trees”, and there were a few surprise products that I didn’t expect to find in such large corporate structures. While not food products, are two examples that I stumbled upon today:

Tom’s of Maine and Burt’s Bees; at one time they were small family businesses, but now they’re owned by Colgate-Palmolive and Clorox Company, respectively, and should be avoided. For additional information about brands one would think would be a quality choice, but have been “green-washed”, check out this Huffington Post article.

Be wary, friends; and do your research.

A casual observer will notice that I only bought one item of produce: mixed sprouts. And, yes, I admit to loving my carbs and chocolate, but I do, as a matter of fact, consume large amounts of fruits and vegetables. These though, I get delivered weekly by Hungry Harvest. For $25/week I get a big box of seasonal produce dropped off on my front porch. Not only that, but they use “rescued” produce, i.e. items that aren’t “pretty” enough to be sold at a grocery store, and would normally go to waste. Furthermore,

“For every delivery, we empower a family in need
by providing access to affordable fruits & veggies through our Produce in a SNAP program and donations to local organizations.”
Read more here.

Highly recommend it since it’s a win-win-win all around. Visit the website and plug your address in to see if they’re delivering in your neighborhood yet.